RE/MAX 440
Gail Ruth

Gail Ruth
4550 W. Tilghman Street  Allentown  PA 18104
Phone:  610-398-8111
Office:  610-398-8111
Cell:  610-390-5434
Fax:  267-354-6263

My Blog

Will Your Trees Survive a Storm?

September 4, 2017 12:50 am

Whether it’s a hurricane, Nor’easter, or severe thunderstorm, extreme weather and high winds present a risk to your trees and home. Large trees that are in leaf are particularly susceptible as the leaves will catch more wind, posing greater mechanical stresses.

You can help protect your property in advance by determining which trees might pose the greatest threat during a storm. The Tree Care Industry Association advises looking for the following warning signs:

- Wires in contact with tree branches. Trees may become energized when they are contacted by electric wires.
​- Dead or partially attached limbs hung up in the higher branches that could fall and cause damage or injury.
​- Cracked stems and branch unions that could cause catastrophic failure of a tree section.
​- Hollow or decayed areas on the trunk or main limbs, or mushrooms growing from the bark that may indicate a decayed and weakened stem.
​- Peeling bark or gaping wounds in the trunk could also indicate structural weakness.
​- Fallen or uprooted trees putting pressure on other trees beneath them.
​- Tight, V-shaped branch unions, which are much more prone to failure than open, U-shaped unions.
​- Heaving soil at the tree base is a potential indicator of an unsound root system.

If your trees demonstrate any of these signs, trim branches accordingly, or contact an expert to see if the tree needs to be removed altogether. The time and investment of such advance work will help keep you safe and prevent much larger costs associated with damage.

If you’d like more homeownership information, please contact me.

Source: The Tree Care Association

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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10 Easy Ways to Live Green

August 31, 2017 12:42 am

Living a more eco-friendly lifestyle is top of mind for more people every day. Happily, it doesn’t take a superhuman effort to do so, and it may even save you a few bucks.

Ecologists suggest simple tips for creating a lifestyle that should help make you – and the planet we live on – proud:

Be coffee savvy – If you brew your own, use a USDA Certified Organic brand, meaning it was grown using sustainable standards. If you stop for coffee every morning, take a reusable cup with you.

Save on printer/copier paper – Whenever possible, print double-sided pages, or re-use sheets of paper for notes, using the blank side before disposing of it.

Start kids young – Train them early to turn off the water while they brush their teeth. Encourage older kids to recycle aluminum cans and plastic bottles, redeeming them for cash they may keep.

Slow down and get pumped – Driving 10 mph above 60 is like adding nearly 50 cents to the price of a gallon of gas, since higher speed equals more guzzling – and check your tire pressure monthly. Adding air as needed can improve mileage by about three percent.

Install dimmer switches – Using them judiciously in the living room, dining room and bedrooms can save you up to $35 annually in electricity costs.

Coddle your water heater – Wrapping an insulation blanket around it can lower its running cost by about nine percent a year.

Buy a water filter – Use a faucet-mounted water filter and refillable bottles. By giving up bottled water, a family of four can not only conserve resources, but also save about $1,250 a year.

Recycle jars and plastics – Empty baby food jars are great for storing screws, nails, and craft supplies, larger jars for storing leftover soups and more – and reuse plastic sour cream, cottage cheese and whipped topping containers to send home ‘care packages’ for your guests and/or for all sorts of leftovers.

Get off junk mail lists – Unwanted catalogs are destroying trees for no good reason. Make the calls and get yourself off their mailing lists.

Grab microfiber – Buy a stack of inexpensive microfiber kitchen towels. One microfiber cloth can take the place of 60 rolls of paper towels before it needs replacing.

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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How to Pack Healthier Food for Your Child

August 31, 2017 12:42 am

While you can urge your child to eat healthier at home, once you send them off to school it can be difficult. But what your child eats during the day will fuel their brains for prime learning, so packing their lunch--rather than relying on the school's choices--is something you should consider.

In the following tips, Sodexo lays out ways to add balance and nutrition to school meals and snacks without sacrificing taste and enjoyment.

Think of the food groups when packing or purchasing a healthy, balanced school meal. Whether preparing meals at home or choosing meals at school, remember all foods groups play a role in creating and sustaining optimal health. These include wholesome grains, lean proteins, colorful fruits and vegetables, and low-fat dairy foods. Look to add variety to your food choices. Instead of relying only on sliced bread, try whole-grain crackers, tortilla wraps or pita bread. Dairy foods are an important source of calcium and vitamin D, and you can help your children meet their three daily servings of dairy with any combination of milk, cheese, and yogurt (single serving, drinkable or squeezable). Pack or choose cut-up fruits and sliced vegetables and enjoy with low-fat dips or portable single-serving sizes of peanut butter or hummus. For more information about food groups and balanced meal planning, check out the ChooseMyPlate educational resources.

Be sure to include a protein source. Protein is an important part of every meal because it provides a source of sustained energy.  As protein foods typically take longer to digest than carbohydrate-rich foods like grains and fruits, adding protein to meals and snacks can help students feel full longer and help them stay focused in the classroom.  And don't forget about breakfast. Consider quick and portable protein sources like peanut butter on whole-grain bread with jam (or soy nut butter or other nut butters), string cheese, hard boiled eggs or a smoothie made with milk or yogurt. Other lunch time protein choices include tuna and lean lunch meats like turkey or chicken; shredded cheese for a salad topping; cottage cheese paired with fruit; and plant-based protein sources like edamame, beans or tofu.

Find creative ways to sneak in fruits and veggies. Add veggies like cherry tomatoes, spinach, broccoli florets, or bell pepper or zucchini slices to pasta salads, or add banana slices to a peanut butter sandwich on whole-grain bread.  Use avocado as a sandwich spread and add lettuce and tomato, or try topping with shredded carrots.

Read labels when choosing treats. The USDA Healthy Hungry Free Kids Act requires schools to offer students snacks and beverages that are lower in calories, sodium and added sugars. Families can implement these same snack and beverage guidelines at home.  Think about the drink. For kids of all ages, water and milk are the best beverage choices. Besides having zero calories, water is a good way to stay hydrated throughout the school day. Milk is an important source of calcium needed to help build strong bones, and is also gaining popularity as an alternative to traditional sports beverages. Look for fat-free or low-fat milk to help manage calorie intake. If your child has a dairy allergy, consider soy milk as a dairy alternative, and be sure to read labels to compare amounts of added sugars.

Source: Sodexo

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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5 Tips to Make Sense of Cyber Security

August 31, 2017 12:42 am

(Family Features)--It's no secret that kids have a sense of invincibility. While that trait can bring some endearing reminders of the innocence of childhood, it can also have some highly unfortunate consequences. In the context of cyber security, an action by an unknowing child can impact the entire family.

The majority of U.S. households are filled with devices that pose a potential threat to your personal security. In fact, according to the 2016 Global Consumer Security Survey by Trend Micro, nearly half of households have two or more computers and nearly a third have three or more smartphones. That means the opportunities are plentiful for missteps to occur.

Despite the many benefits of a highly connected world, the potential for danger is strong. The same study found that 65 percent of respondents' computers had been infected with a virus or malware. Other concerns included damage or loss of files, children viewing inappropriate content, cyberbullying and ID or password theft.

While there are plenty of parental controls and blocks available, they aren't foolproof. Educating children about the potential risks and how to avoid them can go a long way toward protecting your family from potential cyber problems.

Open up a conversation with your children about cyber security with these tips from the experts at Trend Micro:

Understand what you're saying yes to. Be involved, knowledgeable and interested in the devices, apps and sites your children use for school and for fun. For sites they use for school, ask their teachers for more information. For apps they're using at home, spend 15 minutes trying it out yourself.

Use privacy settings and features. Make sure you understand what privacy protections your browser or devices offer for your family when your kids are accessing their favorite sites, apps and online services. Many browsers allow you to prevent sites from tracking what you do and where you go online, so spend some time looking at web browser settings to see what privacy options are available to you. Mobile devices also have settings that can restrict apps from knowing your physical location or accessing your camera, microphone, photos or contacts.

Use features and services available within an app or website. Also take a look at the privacy settings available in the specific apps, websites or games your family uses. Most will let you have a private account, which means the whole world won't be able to see what you post or who you're connected to. It also means that people have to ask your permission before they can follow you.

Remember that being online is a public life. Nothing is truly private online. If you and your family keep this in mind, it can help you all think through what you are about to post, like and click on, as well as who you connect with online.

Talk to other families. Other kids or families may have a different definition of what is or isn't "private." Encourage your kids to talk to their friends about how they will respect each other's privacy online. Good friends will understand, think and ask before posting a photo or information about their friends. Talk to other parents about your feelings on privacy, too, and ask for their opinions with the goal of protecting and respecting each other's privacy online.

Source: Trend Micro

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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How-to Add More Water to Your Diet

August 30, 2017 12:39 am

While most of us have heard we should be drinking eight glasses of water daily, many of us struggle to hit this mark.  Below are a few tips to help you up your water intake.

Add flavor. A squeeze of citrus, fresh mint or a handful of blueberries can make drinking water a bit more fun. Make sure to keep these twists simple and fresh, and avoid sweeteners (artificial or otherwise), which can have negative health repercussions.

Swap in tea. Unsweetened herbal tea can aid your water consumption, especially if you're steeping the bags yourself, which helps assure there are no sneaky additives. Add a hot cup of herbal first thing in the morning and before bed to squeeze in a few more fluid ounces.

Choose fruit. While this should not replace the water you drink, focusing on a few juicy fruits a day can help keep you hydrated. Try watermelon or oranges for a fresh liquid burst.

Keep it cold. If you enjoy cold beverages, then keeping chilled water around can help you drink it down faster.

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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How to Keep Your Pets Safe in a Storm

August 30, 2017 12:39 am

You may have a safety plan in place for your family, but have you thought about your pets? The American Humane Rescue team recently released the following tips to help care for your pet before, during, and after a storm.

Before the storm

- Microchip pets or put a tag on their collar with your name, address and cellphone number so they may be returned quickly in case you are separated from your pets. Be sure that any microchip information is up-to-date.

- Tie down or anchor outside objects that might fly about and injure someone.

- Know a safe place where your pets can go if you need to evacuate or seek shelter. Evacuation destinations may include a friend or family member's home, going to a pet-friendly hotel, or temporarily housing your pet(s) at a boarding facility. Plan multiple routes to your safe destination. Review your evacuation plan and double-check emergency supplies - including bowls, water and food.

- Evacuate your family and pets as early as you can and remember to take your disaster preparedness kit for your pets (i.e. First Aid kit, leashes, and pets' carrying cases, bowls, sanitation materials, chew toy, minimum 3 days, ideally 7-10 days of food, meds, water, your veterinarian's contact information, a photo of your pet).

- Bring pets inside; bring outdoor animals inside with a carrier ready large enough to turn around and lie down comfortably.

- Have a carrier at the ready. The portable carriers(s) should be large enough for your pets to stand-up and turn around in ready to go at a moment's notice. Practice loading cats and dogs in pet carriers before you have to.

- If your family must evacuate, take your pets with you.

During the storm….if you cannot evacuate

- Choose a safe room for riding out the storm—an interior room without windows – and take your entire family there, including your pets.

- Stay with pets. If crated, they depend on you for food and water. Don't leave pets in vehicles.

- Keep your emergency kit in that room with you (food, water, litter, meds, etc).

- Know your pet's hiding places. That's where they may run; keep them with you.

- Secure exits and cat doors so pets can't escape into the storm.

- Do not tranquilize your pets. They'll need their survival instincts should the storm require that.

After the storm

- Make sure the storm has fully passed before going outside and assess damages before allowing children or animals out.

- Keep dogs on a leash and cats in a carrier, and children close at hand. Displaced objects and fallen trees can disorient pets and sharp debris could harm them.

- Give pets time to become re-oriented. Familiar scents and landmarks may be altered and cause a pet to become confused or lost.

- Keep animals away from downed power lines and water that may be contaminated.

- Uncertainty and change in the environment affect animals, too, presenting new stresses and dangers. Your pet's behavior may change after a crisis, becoming more aggressive or self-protective. Be sensitive to these changes and keep more room between them, other animals, children or strangers. Animals need comforting, too. Comfort your pet with kind words and lots of pats or hugs. If possible, provide a safe and quiet environment, even if it is not their own home.

Source: American Humane and the American Humane Rescue program

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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3 Steps Toward Better Sleep

August 30, 2017 12:39 am

(Family Features)--With over-scheduled days full of early-morning conference calls and endless to-do lists, it's impossible to avoid the stress that comes with working hard. Hand-in-hand with all that pressure, a lack of quality sleep can lead to aches and pains, stiffness, sore muscles, tingling or numbness in your extremities, general fatigue, as well as an increased risk of getting sick.

According to the National Sleep Foundation, the average adult needs 7-9 hours of sleep a night. In fact, a survey by Mattress Firm showed a correlation between stress and those who receive less sleep than recommended.

Twice as many stressed people get fewer than five hours of sleep each night compared to those who are not stressed. What's more, those who are stressed are five times more likely to experience insomnia at least once a month.

The proper amount and quality of sleep can have a dramatic impact on your life. If you're stressed and experiencing trouble sleeping, these tips from the sleep experts at Mattress Firm can help ensure you're getting the rest you need to improve your sleep health.

Minimize technology use before you head to bed. The survey found that quality of sleep is negatively impacted because of stress-induced technology use. For example, those who are stressed are 60 percent more likely to watch TV an hour before bed, more than twice as likely to post to social media an hour before bed, twice as likely to check email an hour before bed and more than 40 percent more likely to sleep with their phones next to their beds.

Ensure your body is getting adequate support. What felt comfortable to sleep on eight years ago may not provide the support your body needs today. Your weight, pressure points, ailments, etc. can change over the course of time, so it's important to check the mattress tag. If it's more than 8 years old, it is time to replace it. Another way to make sure your body has the proper support and alignment is to figure out your sleep position and select the right pillows to support your body. This can help alleviate tossing and turning, and provide a more comfortable night of sleep.

Avoid nighttime snacking. About 24 percent of extremely stressed people indulge in a snack an hour before bed, according to the survey. There are many food and drink options that encourage a good night's sleep more than others, such as tryptophan-rich foods like dairy, nuts and seeds, bananas, honey and eggs. Conversely, foods and medications with caffeine and foods with high-fat content should be avoided. The foods you choose are important, but also pay attention to the timing of when you eat and drink. Even fighting stress with an afternoon espresso can affect your ability to sleep hours later when your head hits the pillow.

Source: Mattress Firm

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Try These Easy Indoor Flowering Plants

August 29, 2017 1:03 am

Are you looking to add a bloom to your home? Indoor plants do more than simply add color to your space; they can also improve the mood of those who live with them. If you're looking for a blooming plant, consider one of the following four:

Bromeliads. These funky, spiky plants are in the pineapple family! Bright and tropical, they like lots of light and don't require too much water, which makes them a great choice for a beginning gardener.

African Violet. These are some of the most popular blooming house plants, as they flower for a long duration and are relatively easy to care for.

Begonias. A well-cared for begonia will bloom almost continuously. Place them in a bright location away from windows.

Peace lily. These lovely, graceful flowers are adaptable and low-maintenance. They don't demand too much light and can survive stints of both over- and under-watering.

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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How-to File a Home Insurance Claim

August 29, 2017 1:03 am

Hopefully, you never have to use your homeowner's insurance. But that doesn't mean you shouldn't know how. To help, the I.I.I. offers the following tips on how to file an insurance claim:

Contact your insurer as soon as possible to begin the process. Provide your insurer with your policy number and the best phone number and email address at which to reach you. After a major storm, insurers visit those with the most severe damage first. Be prepared to provide an accurate description of the extent of the property damage. Explain any special needs of your family, particularly if personal circumstances require that you get priority. Ask your insurer when you can expect to be contacted by an insurance adjuster so you are ready for the visit. Since adjusters may be in areas in which cell phone towers are damaged, it is also a good idea to get the phone number of your adjuster's supervisor so you have an additional contact. If you have a flood insurance claim, contact the agent or broker who sold you the policy to start the claims filing process.

Document your loss. The insurance adjuster most likely will inspect the damage to your home, auto and possessions in order to write a check to help you replace, repair and rebuild. It is a good idea to take photographs and document the details of damaged items, including the date of purchase and approximate value—and collect receipts, if you have them. Many companies will ask you to submit an inventory of the items.

Check with your insurer before discarding damaged items and materials. You will generally need to show storm damaged items to your adjuster. If, however, you are required by your local municipality to discard them for safety reasons, take photographs to help with the claims process.

Sign up for SMS/text alerts. Many insurance companies use SMS/text message alerts that will notify you of the status of your claim. You will receive text messages on your phone when you first report your claim, when your estimate is available and when a payment has been sent.

Know what emergency services are available. In the event you need emergency services, such as removing water from your home, covering your roof, or boarding up windows or doors, many companies will dispatch an approved emergency services company to protect your home from further damage. If your home has sustained severe damage, making it unlivable, your homeowners insurer will provide you with a check for additional living expenses.

Keep a claim diary. Good recordkeeping is important when filing a claim. Make a list of everyone you speak to about your claim. Note their name, title and contact information. Also, keep track of the date, time and issues discussed. The better organized you are, the simpler and easier the claims process will be.

Source: Insurance Information Institute

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Where to Find the Best Fall Foliage

August 28, 2017 12:57 am

Hoping to take in the views this fall? You're not alone. Every year in September and October, thousands of Americans make a seasonal trek to witness the changing of the leaves. Below, Cheapflights.com offers tip and our picks for top leafing peeping spots at points throughout the season.

If you're traveling in early September

Aspen, Colo. Leaf peepers have to act fast in Aspen, Colo., as the start and end of the changing of leaves from green to yellow, orange and red typically lasts just a week. It's difficult to predict when the leaves will change, but, once they arrive, it's easy to get Instagram-worthy pics. Stroll through downtown Aspen, kayak the Roaring Fork and Colorado River, hike Snowmass and ride the Silver Queen Gondola to the top of Aspen Mountain — there are leaf peeping options for everyone.

If you're traveling in late September

Kootenay Rockies, British Columbia, Canada - Located in southeastern British Columbia, the Kootenay Rockies afford leaf peepers picture-perfect fall foliage. A short drive from Canadian Rockies International Airport, the region known for its glacier-capped mountains, rivers and alpine lakes, is an increasingly popular spot for seeing autumn leaves change. Head to this scenic spot, nestled along the Rocky Mountains, to admire fall's hues via a multi-day hike along the Rockwall Trail, a soak in natural hot springs or a drive along the Hot Springs Circle Route, a route along the Columbia River and past hoodoos (tall, thin rock formations caused by natural erosion).

Upper Peninsula, Mich. - With 7 million acres of tree coverage, the hardwood forests of Michigan's Upper Peninsula turn fiery red, gold and orange between mid-September and mid-October. Keweenaw Peninsula, technically an island separated from the rest of the Upper Peninsula by the Portage Canal, is one of the most picturesque places to leaf peep because of its abundance of sugar maples, birch and oak trees all aglow. Drive along the 9.5-mile Brockway Mountain Drive, which affords bird's eye views of Lake Superior, flanked each autumn by colorful fall foliage. Houghton County Memorial Airport is just 7 miles from Keweenaw National Park, making it an easy journey for hopeful leaf peepers.

If you're traveling in early October

Stowe, Vt. -There are plenty of places to leaf peep in Vermont as forests cover 3 quarters of the state, and Vermont boasts the highest percentage of maple trees in the U.S. The color change starts in northern Vermont near the Canadian border and at higher elevations in early September and progresses south and into the valleys from late September to the end of October. The fullest color can be found from late-September in the north to mid-October in the south. The first 2 weekends of October are the state's busiest of the year, according to Vermont Department of Tourism & Marketing, so early trip planning is advised as accommodations fill up quickly. One of the best places for leaf peeping is Stowe, Vt. Known for its ski resorts, Stowe is approximately 50 miles and just under 90 minutes by car from Burlington International Airport. Driving along Smugglers Notch mountain pass affords picture-perfect panoramas. Plus, the area includes points of interest like the Alpine Slide at Stowe Mountain Resort and Bingham Falls.

If you're traveling in late October

Oakland, Md. - The tiny town of Oakland, Md., in west-central Maryland is arguably one of the best destinations for leaf peeping in the mid-Atlantic and beyond. It's worth the 160-mile drive from Washington Dulles International Airport or 175-mile drive from Ronald Reagan Washington Airport along the state's scenic byways. Here, the changing fall foliage is celebrated during the Autumn Glory Festival, which celebrates its 50th year Oct. 11-15, 2017. The free, 5-day fall festival includes parades, concerts, art exhibits, and arts and crafts.

Source: Cheapflights.com  

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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